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Request for Evidence

Request for Evidence (RFE)

If you filed a fiancee visa petition (K-1) or a marriage visa Petition (CR-1 or IR-1) by yourself or with the assistance of a “visa service”, chances are you have received or will receive the dreaded Request for Evidence or RFE. When this happens DO NOT attempt to answer it yourself. If you do, even if you answer it correctly, there is a good chance that after it is reviewed by the USCIS you will receive a second RFE. This is because the first RFE does not always list all of the things that are wrong or missing from your petition. If your reply to the RFE is not satisfactory to the USCIS, they will DENY your visa petition and then you will have to either start all over again by filing a new visa petition or give up the idea of ever bringing your fiancee or spouse to the U.S. The USCIS does not give you a second chance...

National Visa Center

When the USCIS has approved the CR1/IR1 visa petition, it is forwarded to the National Visa Center (“NVC”) where original documents are reviewed, background checks are performed on both the petitioner and the beneficiary and an interview date is set. The NVC will forward the petition to the Consulate that will conduct the visa interview....

Immigration 101

There are several ways to obtain a green card. The few lucky selected in the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program just have to go through the application process. However, only 55,000 individuals are given this opportunity every year. Other ways of obtaining a green card can be through family in the United States or through an employer. Some categories have a limit annually (e.g. family based immigration), while other categories have no limit that can be issued (e.g. fiancée of U.S. citizens). A green card gives an individual the right to legally live and work in the United States. Note that individuals with green cards still hold the citizenship of their country of birth, but green card holders can apply for U.S. citizenship after certain amount of years as a card holder. The United States allow individuals to hold dual or multiple citizenship. The current card (United States Permanent Resident Card) is not actually “green”. It got its name from the early version that...